Four pages of butterflies including brown and orange (on this page), blues, skippers, yellows, and striped ones, and a page of colorful moths.
The Phaon Crescent butterflies at the top of this page have a wingspan of approximately one inch. The others on the page are considered large butterflies.

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The Phaon Crescent is brown and tan on the outside and colorful on the inside.
This image shows mostly the outside of the wings.
[The butterfly is perched on a blade of grass with its white legs. Its wings are folded up showing a pattern of brown spots and dashed lines on a white background. There is a few peeks of orange at the top.]

With its wings folded up it is barely wider than the blade of grass on which it is perched.
[The butterfly is perched on a blade of grass with its head pointed toward the camera but downward so that the antenna are easily seen. The antenna are striped light and dark with orange tips at the end. ]

For size comparison there is a Halloween Pennant dragonfly on the left and that small splotch of brown and white about three inches in front of the dragonfly is a Phaon Crescent butterfly.
[Amid the blades of grass are a dragonfly with striped wings and the underside of the wings of a Phaon Crescent (the wings are folded up). ]

As the butterfly opens its wings the many colors of the wings become visible.
[The butterfly is perched on a blade of grass with its head pointed toward the camera. The fuzzy part of the body is visible as the wings are open approximately 30 degrees.]

The many colors and patterns of the wings.
[Top-down view of the butterfly with its wings fully flattened. The edges are brown. The inner parts are an orange base with brown dots and brown line segments. There are also some white dots in the upper part of the wings.]

Same general pattern, but this one has slightly different coloring.
[Top side view of the butterfly with its wings fully flattened. The brown coloring on this one is darker and the white patches are more elongated rather than circular.]

Even though some parts of the edges of the wings are missing, this image gives a view of both the inner and outer wing colors of the Phaon Crescent butterfly.
[This is a back side view of the butterfly with partially open wings so the outer part (brown and white) of the near wing is visible and the inner part of the far wing (orange, brown, white) .]

This is a Gulf Fritillary butterfly which has a wingspan three times the size of the phaon crescent butterfly.
[The butterfly is perched on some leaves with its wings fully open and flat. The wings are mostly orange with strips of brown edging throughout. There are also brown dots and three white dots at the top of each upper wing. The body of the butterfly is orange too.]

Full wings are not necessary for flight for this Gulf Fritillary butterfly.
[The butterfly is perched on some leaves with its wings fully open and flat. The upper and lower wings are the left side are complete. The upper wing on the right side is missing the outer third. The lower wing on the left side is missing almost a full third of the wing from the body out to the edge on the part closest to the upper wing.]

The tips of the antennae are orange.
[The butterfly is perched on a flower with its wings fully open and flat. The upper and lower wings are the left side are complete. The upper wing on the right side is missing the a chunk. The long antennas are black with orange tips which are slightly thicker than the rest of the antennae and contrast against the greenery of the background.]

The other side of the wings of a Gulf Fritillary butterfly has large white patches.
[The butterfly is perched on butterfly plant flower which is partially hidden from the camera by branches. There are many large white spots on this side of the wings. The main color is more brown than orange.]

The body of the Gulf Fritillary butterfly is striped white and orange.
[The butterfly is perched on the yellow center of a flower and has its tongue extended into the yellow. Its wings are up in a vee-shape so the longitutinal white and orange stripes of the body are visible. The tips of the antennae are orange. The wings are translucent and thus light in coloring.]

This Eastern Black Swallowtail butterfly wasn't cooperative about sitting still for me.
[A large dark brown butterfly with a series of yellow spots along the outer edge of the wing.]

A fast-moving Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly.
[The butterfly's wings are completely open. The buttefly is slightly blurry but the colors are clear. It is nearly all brown except at the edges which have white spots along them. At the bottom of the lower wings are small patches of orange and quite a bit of blue.]

Another view of the Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly in flight.
[Against the blurred background of grass the butterfly's body and inner wings are in focus as the outer wings blur with motion. The butterfly appears to be about to land on a bush in focus in the foreground.]

I saw this Monarch butterfly on my morning exercise route. I'm not sure what took a chunk out of its wing, but it seemed unable to fly. It was quite agitated and trying to walk away from me as I unpacked my phone from its holder and took a few photos.
[A black and orange butterfly is on the grass. The left wing has an outer portion with spots on it. The right wing is missing that entire spotted portion of the wing.]

Continue to page 2 of 5 to see the "blue" butterflies.

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